The C8 Corvette will conquer the world with right-hand drive and a stand-alone sub-brand

The 2020 Chevrolet Corvette will tempt 75 countries and territories that drive on the left side of the road, but it won’t be sold under the Chevy brand in all of them.

The C8 Corvette will be sold just as the Corvette, without Chevrolet in the name, in the one market where it makes some sense. That market is Australia, where the Corvette is debuting in 2021 in right-hand-drive form. That’s right: The Corvette will be built in a postal delivery-friendly form for sports car enthusiasts Down Under for the first time ever. And even though it will be sold through Holden dealerships, it won’t be badged Holden or Chevrolet, Australia’s Motoring reports.

As much as we’d love to see the C8 Corvette badged a Holden, just to marvel at the lion badge on the frunk, the marketing move makes some sense. 

First, the car itself is actually going to be sold through a certain number of Holden and HSV (Holden Special Vehicles) dealers, but not all of them. Second, the Australian market only gets the Z51 package and is expected to be quite pricey as is, even though Australia won’t get the Stingray model, Motoring reports. Third, the car already doesn’t have Chevrolet badges, except for the emblem within the flag logo. The logo is staying, so this approach isn’t all that significant when it comes to interior details. Finally, the name Corvette has been strong enough internationally to stand on its own for some time, even though in most countries people still know it as the “Chevrolet Corvette.”  

The major departure here is the car not being rebadged a Holden like used to happen to just about all GM-built models built globally and exported to Australia. This move is due to GM’s expected desire to preserve the C8’s American character, rather than gluing a Holden badge on the car. 
 

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

If you look closely, you can see the Corvette flags slightly hidden in the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette’s headlight assembly.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

There’s a lot going on with the new Corvette, but here’s a chance to slow down and take in some of its finer points.

The larger significance here, of course, is the Corvette being built in right-hand-drive form for the first time. This makes it more suitable for export to countries where it has never been a big player, such as the U.K., Ireland and Japan, as one expects, but also India, New Zealand, large parts of the Caribbean, numerous countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Indonesia, Malaysia and large parts of Southeast Asia. In total, the new Corvette is suited for 75 countries and territories where traffic keeps on the left side of the road. They’re not all big supercar markets, but the U.K., India and Japan alone have well over a billion people combined, making the case for privately importing a C8 Corvette a better proposition than it used to be, even if there isn’t a Chevy dealer in the country. Indeed, the C8 is expected to join the left-hand-drive Camaro in Japan’s Chevrolet dealerships, where it has been offered alongside the C7.

The biggest question with the right-hand-drive Corvette might be which foreign market develops the biggest taste for the new model? We have a feeling that’s a question GM is also anxious to answer. 
 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 

The eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette has no shortage of buttons and screens but lacks a manual transmission. Though, you can still control gear changes with the steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. 
























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Best RV Air Conditioners: Keep Your RV Cool In The Summer Heat

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Camping and roaming around are the two main reasons to get an RV. Summer is the ideal season for camping, although the hot temperature offers less-than-ideal conditions. To combat the heat, you’ll need a high-efficiency RV AC. The best RV air conditioner makes your adventure more comfortable and keeps the indoor air clean. What is the best RV air conditioner? You’ll find the answer below along with recommendations for the quietest RV AC and what to look for when buying your next energy-efficient RV air conditioner unit.



Benefits of RV Air Conditioners

  • Convenient camping. When the temperature outside becomes unbearable, you’ll appreciate the cool air inside your RV. Whether you’re camping or on the road, an efficient RV air conditioner is a necessity. It makes the difference between a comfortable experience and one you’d rather forget. 
  • Get the most out of your RV. Sightseeing aboard the RV is a pleasure in itself. With AC units for travel trailers, you can maximize the time you spend on your RV. The AC improves the quality of your sleep and makes the RV feel like home.
  • Clean indoor air. The air quality inside the RV gets better with an AC unit installed. No more dust or allergies; fresh and moving air is less likely to breed germs or impact the health of those living on board.

Types of RV Air Conditioners

Rooftop 

Rooftop air conditioner units are popular since they’re installed on the roof, saving you space inside the RV. Their ideal place on top of the vehicle means the brisk air outside cools the RV AC unit. Low-profile units consume less energy and have a lower risk of damage when passing under bridges. Rooftop AC systems come in two options: ducted and non-ducted. Ducted systems are suited for large RVs, as they push the cool air to all corners of the RV. Non-ducted units are suitable for smaller RVs and cost less.  

Portable

Portable units have a smaller size and a better design. You can move them around, and they don’t require installation. They take up space inside the RV and need extra care for handling. The units are energy efficient but require a hose to avoid water leakage. Instead of the usual refrigeration process, the unit evaporates the air and releases a cold air stream to cool the area. Portable systems work best in dry heat as opposed to humid environments. 

Window 

Window units are similar to those used in homes. They save up space and have a good cooling capacity. Ease of installation is another perk of this type. They come in small sizes for better handling and power efficiency and mount into most windows with little effort.

Top Brands

Dometic

Dometic was established in 1919. Such a long history gives the company an advantage in making high-quality products. With a special focus on RVs, the company’s mission is to ensure the mobile life is more comfortable. Products include DOMETIC Sanitation 143002P041 Rivet Semi Tube.

Atwood

Brothers James and Seth Atwood founded this company in 1909. Over the years, it has offered the automotive world some outstanding products. Recently, it was bought over by Dometic, although it still offers products under its own brand. Some of these products include the Atwood 15026 Non-Ducted A/C Unit, and Atwood 15027 Ducted A/C Unit.

Airxcel

Airxcel is a holding company with products that cover many categories outside of the automotive market. Besides air conditioners, the company makes water heaters, sealants, furnaces, ventilation systems, cooking appliances, rooftop products, window coverings, Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic (FRP), and composite panels for RVs. Under this category, the company makes the Airxcel 08-0079 Mach 3 Plus.

RV Air Conditioner Pricing

  • Under $200: Air conditioners in this low price range are not designed specifically for recreational vehicles. These cheap RV air conditioning units are typical window mounted. They also consume more energy and are on the noisy side.
  • $200-$500: In this price range, you can get a good portable AC for the RV. They have good performance, with reduced power consumption, and are suited for small- to medium-sized recreational vehicles.
  • Over $600: This level of investment can get you a top-notch air conditioner. Options here are generally compatible with all types of RVs. They tend to offer high performance, a great cooling capacity, and quiet operation.

Key Features

BTU Power

BTU stands for British Thermal Unit. It’s a technical specification that can help you decide which AC suits your RV based on its size and average local weather conditions. The average AC unit has 13,500 BTU power. This is enough power to cool down a large RV. Humid weather conditions demand more BTU power in your AC. If you visit areas with high humidity or extreme temperatures, you’ll need to invest in a unit with more BTU power. 

Power Consumption

Air conditioning units consume a lot of energy. That can be a problem for an RV that uses a portable generator. Choosing a unit that consumes less power saves you money in the long run. These units are also environmentally-friendly. If you travel across the border on your RV, make sure the unit is compatible with various power sources in different countries. 

Air Purifier

Air with poor quality is a health hazard, especially for people prone to allergies. Not all RV air conditioners have built-in air purifying systems. Those that have them, however, do a good job of removing odors. The air purifier improves the quality of the air inside the RV and keeps it fresh and clean, regardless of the conditions outside.

Other Considerations

  • Noise: All air conditioning units make noise; some are quieter than others. A quiet AC means better sleep at night since the little noise it makes blends into the background. 
  • Heat Pump: An AC unit with a heat pump means you can use it to keep you warm when the temperature drops. This is useful if you travel around during different seasons. The best RV heat pumps will keep you cozy even in the cold winter.

Best RV Air Conditioner Reviews & Recommendations 2019

Best RV Air Conditioner Overall: Dometic B59516.XX1J0 Brisk

Dometic’s Brisk B59516.XX1J0 sets itself apart from the competition with a bunch of features that make it our top pick. This RV air conditioner packs a powerful punch with a whopping 15,000 BTU power to cool recreational vehicles of all sizes. Add to that the sleek design that combines with excellent cooling powers. You don’t need to worry about power consumption, as this model is eco-friendly and doesn’t use much electricity. 

It’s worth mentioning that this model was redesigned from the bottom up for power and performance. As a result, the Brisk II is now compatible with standard air vents. You get better cooling capacity since the distribution box uses central air delivery. Moreover, the unit is made from quality materials for better durability, absorbing shocks and vibrations with its stable and strong frame. 

One thing to watch out for with this model is the base pan. It’s less durable than the rest of the unit. The packaging is another issue that needs to be addressed since the box doesn’t protect the unit from major damage during shipping. Finally, the starting electrical load is too high for small generators.

Click Here to See Prices on Amazon

Best RV Air Conditioner Value: Honeywell MN10CESWW 10000 BTU Portable

The Honeywell MN10CESWW is the type of portable AC that doesn’t need much fuss or experience to install. As with all portable types, it’s easy to set up. All you need to do is put it in a corner or under a shelf and turn it on. With 10,000 BTU power, it cools large areas and has a power consumption that is reasonable for portable models.

Durability is another distinguishing feature of the Honeywell. Since it’s purring safely inside the RV, as opposed to being exposed to the elements and UV rays on top of the vehicle, it will give you years of good service. Moreover, the model’s portability is its best asset; you can move it around with you inside the RV. Another attractive feature this AC has is the convenient remote control.

The downside to this portable AC is in the time it takes to cool down the area. Like all portable units, it needs a hose to avoid leakage; the hose that comes with this model is short and bulky. You also need to be wary of placing the unit close to the wall since the exit hose comes out of the rear side.   

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Best RV Air Conditioner Honorable Mention: Dometic Polar White 13,500 BTU

With a unique aerodynamic design, the Dometic Polar White is the ideal rooftop air conditioner for RVs. You barely get any wind drag as you drive thanks to its low profile. It’s both compact and lightweight, making it easier to handle and install. Under its shroud, the Polar White boasts of 13,500 BTU power to cool vehicles from medium to large sizes.

Digging deeper, we can see why this model is popular with RV owners. Right off the bat, it pumps 15 percent more airflow than other models. Powerful doesn’t mean noisier, however, as the dampening brackets take care of the vibration and operation noise. In addition, compatibility with both ducted and non-ducted systems makes the Polar a good choice for all types of recreational vehicles.

One major drawback of this model is its high power consumption. You’d need a big and reliable generator to get all its cooling performance. In some units, the wheel fan arrives defective and needs to be replaced. Finally, the unit doesn’t come with a thermostat or a control unit, so you’ll have to buy them separately.  

Click Here to See Prices on Amazon

Tips

  • Make sure to clean and change the filters regularly. Without proper maintenance, they get clogged, reducing the airflow.
  • Use a spray or foaming cleaner when cleaning the compressor. Then, with a vacuum hose, pull out the loosened debris and dirt.
  • Ducted units need servicing too. Use a vacuum hose to clean the air vents.

FAQs

Q: Can I heat my RV with the air conditioning unit as well?

A: You cannot use the unit to heat the RV in cold weather unless it comes with a heat pump. If your AC doesn’t have a heat pump, you can buy heat strips or a heater assembly kit. 

Q: How often should I maintain my RV air conditioner?

A: Every two months. Check for cracks in the plastic. Clean the filters and air vents and check for wear and tear marks on the unit.

Q: Can I run my RV air conditioner on battery power?

A: Yes you can. You’ll need extra batteries for that and a source of power to recharge them. Solar panels are also a good source of electricity that can run the AC in the absence of a powerful generator.

Final Thoughts

For our top pick, we chose the Dometic B59516.XX1J0 Brisk. The reputable brand offers reliability, durability, and good performance. The low profile unit is both compact and lightweight and has a maximized air flow and great cooling capacity.

The Honeywell MN10CESWW 10000 BTU Portable is our value pick. Besides its affordable price, this portable AC unit is easy to set up. It cools large areas efficiently and doesn’t need extra care or maintenance.

These are our top RV air conditioner picks. If you have tried other brands, we’d like to hear about them in the comments section below.

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Lotterer: New FE rules make for ‘more civilised’ races

Porsche Formula E driver Andre Lotterer believes reducing energy by a set amount following caution periods will result in “more civilised races” in the all-electric series.

For the 2019/20 season, which got underway with two races in Riyadh last month, a change to FE’s sporting rules has been made so that a set amount of energy will be deducted from each car after in-race interruptions such as safety car periods and full course yellows.

The exact amount is determined by the length of the suspension and is equal to 1kW/h per minute for the duration of the caution period.

The system was tested by a pair of non-competitive race simulations in pre-season testing at Valencia in October, which were intended to ensure a smooth operation of the system for the new campaign.

The new rule was used in the first of the two Diriyah E-Prix races after a late-race clash between Daniel Abt and Antonio Felix da Costa broke Abt’s wing and led to him crashing out.

Lotterer, who finished second for Porsche in that opening race, said he thought the new rule “does produce a bit more civilised races, especially from the beginning”.

“[Drivers] betting on safety cars or anything and driving flatout [cannot do that anymore], so it’s nice because you can be a bit more strategic and things make a little bit more sense,” he added. “So I think it’s a good way to do it.”

Stoffel Vandoorne finished third in the same race for Mercedes, which was won by Virgin Racing driver Sam Bird.

When asked for his thoughts on how the new rule worked in full race conditions, the Belgian said: “I think that adds a little bit of more strategy to the race.

“In the beginning it looked a little bit more calm because everyone was trying different things – saving a bit more or not. So, I think it’s good for us.”

Stoffel Vandoorne, Mercedes Benz EQ, EQ Silver Arrow 01

Photo by: Alastair Staley / Motorsport Images

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See The 2021 Audi RS6 Avant Hit 176 MPH On A Damp Autobahn

It can’t get here soon enough.

There’s something pleasant about watching a high-horsepower Audi rocket down the German Autobahn as cars quickly move to the left lane as the wide, angular front fascia of the 2021 RS6 Avant fills their rearview mirrors. It’s something that rarely, if ever, happens on American highways, and seeing such vehicular respect on the road makes us a bit jealous. But it does allow for the Audi RS6 Avant to stretch its legs in a way no American can legally. In the video above, we see the super wagon cruising at well over 170 miles per hour (273 kilometers per hour) in the wet. 

Though speed is where the RS6 Avant excels. Under the hood is a twin-turbocharged, hybridized, 4.0-liter V8 producing 591 horsepower (441 kilowatts) and 590 pound-feet (800 Newton-meters) of torque. Power routes to all four wheels through Audi’s full-time Quattro all-wheel-drive system, rocketing the wagon to 62 miles per hour (100 kilometers per hour) in 3.6 seconds. The top speed is limited to 155 mph (250 kph). However, opt for the Dynamic Package, and top speed jumps to 174 mph (280 kph). Get the Dynamic Package Plus and top speed increases again to 190 mph (305 kph). 

The Audi RS6 Avant in the video above likely has the Dynamic Package Plus as it has no trouble reaching 176 mph (284 kph), just a bit above the Dynamic Package’s top speed. Then the driver steps off the accelerator as a car moves into the right lane before quickly moving back to the left lane, realizing its miskate. It’s an impressive display of performance for a wagon capable of hauling five people and cargo – 20.0 cubic feet (565 liters) of space in the trunk and up to 60.0 cubic feet (1,680 liters) in total interior volume.

Gallery: 2020 Audi RS6 Avant

2020 Audi RS6 Avant
2020 Audi RS6 Avant
2020 Audi RS6 Avant
2020 Audi RS6 Avant
2020 Audi RS6 Avant
2020 Audi RS6 Avant
2020 Audi RS6 Avant
2020 Audi RS6 Avant

The video gives us a driver-eye view out over the car’s hood. We can see the new interior with Audi’s latest version of its virtual cockpit. Audi hasn’t released pricing for the Audi RS6 Avant just yet, but if you live in the U.S., it’s best to budget in some track time because this kind of driving on American roads will earn you a ticket. Or worse.

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Gran Turismo's 2019 FIA Online Championship: Season Recap and Final Driver Rankings

March 2019 doesn’t seem all that long ago. That was when Kazunori Yamauchi took to the stage in Paris, adjacent to the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile headquarters itself, to reveal the plans for the 2019 FIA season.

Almost ten months on, Germany’s Mikail Hizal has claimed the title of Gran Turismo world champion, alongside the Toyota team of Rayan Derrouiche (France), Igor Fraga (Brazil), and Tomoaki Yamanaka (Japan), who won the Manufacturer Series. The quartet headed back to Paris last weekend to claim their prizes alongside other world champions like Lewis Hamilton in F1 and Fernando Alonso in the World Endurance Championship.

With 2019 now consigned to the history books, we’re looking over the stories of the main players and key events across the 40 weeks, as well as looking forward to what’s coming next.

#1: Mikail Hizal 🍪 (TRL_LIGHTNING)

  • Avg. Finishing Position: 3rd
  • Race Wins: 9
  • Best Result: 1st (World Final)
  • Worst Result: 10th (Nurburgring Repechage, Tokyo Semi-Final A)
  • Previous Rank: #2 (▲1)
  • Highest Rank: #1

Up until Monaco Hizal had a pretty variable season. At the opening event in Paris, the German seemed the favorite to win, but made a small mistake in the final – at the awkward pit entrance at Autopolis – and ultimately lost out to Nicolas Rubilar.

A missable weekend in his home event at the Nurburgring was followed by a repeat of Paris, only Hizal was not at fault this time and again ended up second. “The Lift” proved almost a turning point not just for Hizal but the whole World Tour.

He reacted in the best way possible, heading to Austria and simply dominating proceedings. With the pressure off – and the jetlag on – in Tokyo, Hizal had another event to forget, but Monaco proved that he was among the deadliest drivers on the grid. The German set pole position in the top 12 shootout, and then won every single race.

It couldn’t have come at a better time for him. Hizal may not even be able to drive in 2020, due to an internship as part of his studies. That might mean we have another new name on the trophy next November.

#2: Cody N. Latkovski 🇦🇺 (Nik_Makozi)

  • Avg. Finishing Position: 3rd
  • Race Wins: 2
  • Best Result: 1st (World Semi-Final)
  • Worst Result: 9th (Paris Final)
  • Previous Rank: #3 (▲1)
  • Highest Rank: #2

Latkovski’s name could well succeed Hizal’s. In fact of all the drivers in the Nations Cup, none has a better average finishing position than the Australian. Across his 16 races this year, he’s finished on the podium 11 times, claiming an overall Tour podium on four of six occasions.

Speed hasn’t necessarily been Latkovski’s issue. In the early part of the year, it was more a case of some over-optimistic driving.

A controversial closing few corners in the Nurburgring event saw the stewards slap Latkovski with a five-second penalty. Although the news in New York was dominated by the action between Hizal and Fraga, Latkovski drew the ire of the stewards again and the joint-largest penalty ever issued at a World Tour event.

Since that nadir, Latkovski’s driving has improved to eliminate these errors. Still at the sharp end of most races and still not someone you want chasing you down, the Australian has proved he can win trophies in both Manufacturer Series and the FIA’s own Digital Cup. Perhaps in 2020 that will extend to the Nations Cup too.

#3: Igor Fraga 🇧🇷 (IOF_RACING17)

  • Avg. Finishing Position: 3rd
  • Race Wins: 5
  • Best Result: 1st (Nurburgring Final, New York Final)
  • Worst Result: 10th (World Semi-Final)
  • Previous Rank: #1 (▼2)
  • Highest Rank: #1

There’s no doubting that Fraga is the driver all other drivers fear. He only drove eight races in 2019, and in that time he won five of them and two World Tour events. However, the Brazilian couldn’t match his title-winning form of the previous year.

Fraga didn’t have the best opening event in Paris. An error in the pit stop in his race at Fuji Speedway saw him drop into the repechage and, although he came through that, he was simply too far down to make an impact in the final. Then followed his four-in-a-row form, winning both of his semi-finals and finals in Germany and New York, but the latter involved the most talked-about moment of all.

“The Lift” was an unfortunate lapse of judgment from the champion. Preceded by a moment of intelligent tactical driving, Fraga tried to break the rhythm of the chasing Hizal by going off-throttle through Eau Rouge. With no warning and nowhere left to go, the German speared into the back of Fraga’s slowing car, destroying his momentum and denying an interesting battle for the last couple of laps. The move split opinion and fractured the community, although to his credit Fraga later apologized for the example he’d set.

Other obligations kept the Brazilian out of the picture in the other remaining events, but nobody expected his Nations Cup to fizzle out the way it did. A simple driving error at turn one on lap one in race one knocked him out of the competition, resulting in his lowest ever race finish at a live event.

His real-world racing development will continue in 2020, which may interrupt his GT Sport activities. Still, we wouldn’t bet against him coming back and retaking his title.

#4: Takuma Miyazono 🇯🇵 (Kerokkuma_ej20)

  • Avg. Finishing Position: 3rd
  • Race Wins: 2
  • Best Result: 1st (World Semi-Final)
  • Worst Result: 7th (World Final, Race 3)
  • Previous Ranking: #4 (▲0)
  • Best Ranking: #4

When Miyazono burst onto the scene in New York, it was with a bizarre pit strategy for the final Nations Cup race which almost paid off. But for a collision with Latkovski, he may have bagged his first World Tour podium in his first World Tour.

Since then, the Japanese driver has established himself very firmly as one of the front-runners. As one of only five drivers to win more than one race, Miyazono’s average race finish position is equal to anyone’s.

With a seemingly unflappable driving style, Miyazono has retained some remarkably consistent form over the World Tours this year, winning his semi-final at the World Final and eventually taking an unsurprising third place behind Hizal and Latkovski. Only a very unusual self-inflicted error at Le Mans prevented him from finishing higher

Surprisingly, Miyazono wasn’t able to take victory in his home World Tour in Tokyo, with victory instead going to countryman Ryota Kokubun. Expect Miyazono to take the opportunity if it comes round again in 2020, and to take home one of the trophies at next year’s Final.

#5: Coque Lopez 🇪🇸 (Williams_Coque14)

  • Avg. Finishing Position: 4th
  • Race Wins: 0
  • Best Result: 2nd (Nurburgring Semi-Final, Tokyo Semi-Final)
  • Worst Result: 9th (World Final, Final Race)
  • Previous Ranking: #5 (▲0)
  • Best Ranking: #4

Going into the World Final in Monaco, Coque Lopez had one claim to fame that no other driver could match. He had been to all five World Tour events and on each occasion qualified to the final directly from his semi-final. In fact he’d never finished a race lower than sixth.

Although that run came to an end in Monaco, he nonetheless put on another strong showing that could be a prelude to a great 2020.

2019 started fairly well for Lopez, but nearly hit a spectacular high in Germany. With one corner left in the final race, the Spaniard looked set for victory but was caught by Fraga and Latkovski behind him. Lopez came off third-best, eventually falling further down the order when his car ran out of fuel recovering to the circuit.

It showed he had speed though, and in New York he joined Fraga and Hizal on a rather tense podium. More solid drives followed, and although he entered his first repechage at the World Final he showed some prodigious speed to run from last on the grid to third and qualification for the final itself.

Incredibly, Lopez didn’t win a single race – from 16 entries – in 2019. We’ll expect him to break that duck in 2020.

Outside The Top Five

There’s plenty of drivers who are close to our lead five, but over the course of the year there is a small gap between them.

Nicolas Rubilar, our first World Tour winner, might be disappointed with his results in Monaco. We’ve seen flashes of his form in Paris reflected in semi-finals at multiple World Tours, but doesn’t seem to have hit that form again. Ryota Kokubun also had a forgettable Monaco event, eliminated in his semi-final after an incident at the Dragon Trail circuit. They rank 11th and 15th respectively.

Moving the other way is Baptiste Beauvois. He’s just outside the top five, and hit pretty much his peak 2019 form in the Principality, placing 2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 4th and 5th in his five races. Giorgio Mangano, the first ever World Tour winner back in 2018, sits in the top ten with countryman Salvatore Maraglino, both showing they are often in the mix.

North America’s top two drivers sit 15th and 16th. In addition to being so closely matched, Daniel Solis and Andrew Brooks are best friends too — the touching scenes of Brooks embracing Solis as the latter won the repechage in Monaco to qualify through to the final is one that will linger for years. It’s all the more remarkable that, at home, Solis plays with a regular PlayStation controller.

In all, 45 drivers qualified to the World Tours and World Final. That alone is a remarkable achievement, and we look forward to seeing who can break into the upper echelons in 2020.

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Jean Todt wants 12 teams, but only competitive ones

FIA president Jean Todt says he and F1 CEO Chase Carey would like to have 12 teams on the grid, but only if they are competitive.

Since 2017 the grid has remained stable at ten teams – 2016 proved the last season for Manor Racing, while before that HRT folded in 2012 and Caterham in 2014 after the trio had taken the grid to 12 teams back in 2010.

Haas arrived as a new team in 2016 and have proved a success story having established themselves in Formula 1, and Todt would like to welcome more new entries, though he’s yet to be approached by an outfit who could be competitive.

“I would prefer to have 12 teams,” Todt is quoted by Motorsportweek.com.

“But then again I do sympathise with the teams, because if you have 12 teams of course it takes the value off their team.

“We have often teams willing to commit and sincerely we have never been convinced by the solidity of the teams, but I mean if we could be convinced it’s really a proper team really to join, myself, I would be quite happy to have 12 teams in Formula 1.

“I think that’s the proper number to hold the Formula 1 championship. Saying that with 10 teams it can work, if you have 10 good teams, competitive [teams], it can work.”

Formula 1 will undergo a drastic facelift in 2021, with a new $175m-per-season budget cap a part of that, and Carey thinks showing potential team owners that F1 is a good investment is crucial going forward.

“I think one of our key priorities is making owning a team, or making team ownership, a better business,” he explained.

“Most of the people I’ve had preliminary conversations with want to see rules in place that provide the framework for a healthier business model.

“We want owning a team, like in other sports, to have a franchise value, as part of that we’ve talked about what is the process to enter a new team, and I think it supports that, how do we make owning a new team something that is a good business proposition not just a pursuit of passion.

“I think our priority, I think we’ve said before, is we want healthy teams, quality more than quantity, to me having an 11th team that sits at the back of the track is not adding for the fans what would improve the sport.

“I’d like to have an 11th team but I’d like to have an 11th team that is a competitive and healthy, and bring something to the sport.

“[And then] I’d rather 12 healthy team to 10 healthy teams but I don’t want 10 healthy teams and two struggling teams. 12 healthy teams is better than 10 teams.”

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Best Grease Guns: Great Solutions to Lubricated Fittings

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Vehicles and other machines require proper lubrication to run smoothly and efficiently. A grease gun is a great tool for lubricating fittings, bearings, and other components, making it easy to keep everything in perfect working order. Read on to find out everything you need to know about finding the best grease gun for your needs.



Benefits of a Grease Gun

  • Waste prevention. Proper lubrication is a necessity for any vehicle or machine, and a grease gun is an efficient delivery system for that grease, oil, or lube. Since you’re able to measure out exactly how much is dispensed per stroke, you’ll prevent waste from overflowing product.
  • Product longevity. Not only will proper lubrication of car parts keep your vehicle running smoothly for longer, a grease gun that is properly maintained will also stand the test of time. That’s especially useful if you’re a hobby or professional mechanic who frequently uses grease.
  • Better saturation. Many delivery systems spray grease into the general area of a component. A grease gun will allow you to deliver grease with a lot more precision, saturating the part properly.
  • Accuracy and speed. A grease gun helps get grease where it needs to be quickly and accurately. This is especially useful if you’re a shop owner, where every minute of work time counts. A grease gun allows you to grease the entire underside of a car in about a minute, which is significantly faster than using a push can or another delivery system.
  • Money Saving. Because grease guns are so accurate, they allow you to save a lot on the extra product, as well as on components. Properly-lubricated parts will last a lot longer than poorly-maintained ones, saving you money on replacement costs.

Types of Grease Guns

Hand Lever

As the name suggests, hand lever grease guns are manually powered. They’re able to build a decent amount of pressure (up to 10,000 PSI in some cases) and are best suited for grease fittings and parts were precision is not critical.

Pneumatic

Grease guns that use air pressure can build up to 6,000 PSI and can be calibrated for precision. You can adjust the amount of grease dispersed per stroke on some models, while others will deliver a set amount. Pneumatic grease guns are best suited for more precise tasks where a super-high PSI isn’t needed.

Battery-Powered

Cordless grease guns are battery-powered, delivering convenience and power in a lightweight package. Typically, battery-powered grease guns can deliver the highest pressure of all and have variable flow rates to easily adjust the amount of grease dispensed per stroke. For heavy machinery and precision applications, battery-powered grease guns are the way to go.

Top Brands

DeWalt

Founded 95 years ago and headquartered in Towson, Md., DeWalt is one of the biggest names in power and hand tools worldwide. Frequently among the top sellers in a number of product categories, DeWalt produces quality equipment that lasts. Among the top sellers is the 20V Cordless Grease Gun.

LockNLube

Headquartered in West Lebanon, N.H., LockNLube has been making a name for itself in the past decade. Specializing in grease solutions for automotive and heavy machinery, LockNLube’s product selection is unrivaled. The company’s best selling product is the Lever Grip Grease Gun.

Lincoln Industrial

Since 1910, Lincoln Industrial has been making quality automated lubrication systems, manual lubrication equipment, and industrial pumping systems. Given the company’s worldwide reach, you can rest assured that its products stand the test of time. Among the best sellers is the Air Operated Grease Gun.

Grease Gun Pricing

  • Under $20: At this price point, you’ll have a few basic grease guns to choose from. Most of these will be lever action with either straight or flexible nozzles. The quality can vary greatly, so if you’re looking for something at a low price point, make sure the company making it is reputable.
  • $20-$70: In the mid-range, you’ll find a couple of good, quality options. Many of these will also be lever action, but a small number of air operated grease guns are also available at this price.
  • Over $70: The high-end includes pressure and battery-operated grease guns, many of which are best suited to industrial purposes. A couple of products are also suited to automotive applications but are still a better investment for professional mechanics than for the at-home repairman.

Key Features

Nozzle

The type of nozzle is critical for proper grease delivery. Grease guns tend to come equipped with one of two styles: a straight, short nozzle or a flexible metal nozzle (these are available in several different lengths). For hard-to-reach places, the flexible nozzle is the way to go, as the accuracy will be greatly improved.

Barrel Size

Depending on the main purpose of the grease gun, the barrel size will matter. If you’re looking to deposit a lot of grease in a short amount of time, you’ll want a grease gun with bigger barrel size. On the other hand, if you’re looking for small specialty applications only, a smaller barrel will do the trick.

Other Considerations

  • Ergonomics: Grease guns come in a wide variety of different shapes and sizes. You’ll want one that fits well in your hand and feels comfortable to use. For that, look for cushioned grips with divots to make holding onto the grease gun easier.
  • Action Types: Try to keep in mind what purpose you’ll be using the grease gun for most commonly. Are you oiling up car undersides? Are you greasing components on a lawnmower or chainsaw? Or maybe you need something truly multi-functional. This is an important thing to keep in mind, as different types of grease guns work best for different kinds of projects.
  • Tube Length: We’ve mentioned it before, but it’s worth mentioning again. The length of the nozzle tube is really important to ensure the proper delivery of the grease to the site it’s needed. Longer flexible nozzles are available in a range of lengths to suit your needs.
  • Quality: The higher the quality, the smoother the operation. High-quality grease guns will feature working parts that make using the product a joy. You’ll want one that is easy to use, dispenses grease evenly and precisely, and eliminates air pockets through a bleeder valve.
  • Materials: Most grease guns on the market are fashioned from metal, a durable material that will withstand the pressure built during use. Low-quality options may feature plastic components as well, which are prone to wear and breakage.

Best Grease Gun Reviews & Recommendations 2019

Best Grease Gun Overall: Lincoln 1162 Air Operated Grease Gun

Designed with a variable speed trigger, this Lincoln air-operated grease gun provides excellent grease flow control. The trigger is also fully automatic, making continuous operation effortless, and the advanced pump design eliminates priming issues otherwise common with pneumatic grease guns. With a max PSI of 6,000, this model is suitable for a number of different applications. The 30-inch hose is flexible enough to reach most bearings, even the ones located in the hardest-to-access spots.

Keep in mind that you’ll need an air compressor to make this grease gun work. It needs about 80 PSI of air capacity to function properly. When in use, the grease cartridges can easily be swapped, making it ideal for a variety of lubrication jobs. Air bleeding is also really easy, which keeps in tune with the overall user-friendly design. It’s also designed to prevent spills, keeping your work zone free of messy grease, and it’s among the fastest grease guns on the market, so you’ll get your work done quickly.

The only drawback we found is the plunger in the main bore. On occasion, it has the tendency to jam up, requiring a re-prime of the grease gun, which can be a hassle. Other than that, this model works like a charm. It’s also backed by a one-year warranty.

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Best Grease Gun Value: Lumax LX-1152 Heavy Duty Pistol Grease Gun

Lumax may be a lesser-known brand, but their manual grease gun works like a charm, rivaling some of the bigger names out there. Its rugged cast head develops up to 7,000 PSI, making it an ideal tool for many of your machinery lubricating needs. You can load this model three different ways, via standard cartridge, suction, or bulk fill. It’s also equipped with an air bleeder valve to vent air pockets and to help prevent priming issues.

The heavy 18-gauge steel barrel offers durability, and a follower rod lock prevents accidental discharge, making it a great choice for seasoned professionals and newbies alike. It also features an 18-inch flexible hose and nozzle, which is a little shorter than the competition but still plenty to reach most bearings, fittings, and other components. A deluxe, oil-resistant grip is contoured for comfort, and the chrome plating finish on the handle protects the tool against corrosion. Its output is 115 grams of grease per 100 strokes, which translates to a flow rate of about 1.15 grams per push.

Keep in mind that you do get what you pay for. The overall quality of this value pick won’t match up to a grease gun in the mid-range, and there have been reports that this model can occasionally leak a bit of grease in random spots. That can make it difficult to handle as well as messier than necessary. If you’re going to be using your grease gun a lot, we suggest investing in a little more quality. Otherwise, this model will likely work well for you.

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Best Grease Gun Honorable Mention: DeWalt DCGG571B Battery Powered Grease Gun

This DeWalt battery-powered grease gun features a powerful motor that delivers up to 10,000 PSI. The cordless motor is powered by a lithium-ion battery that can push 16 cartridges per single charge. Ideal for high-volume pump pushes of up to 5 ounces, this grease gun is best suited for heavy machinery and large vehicles. A 42-inch extra long, flexible hose and nozzle make reaching those hard to access bearings super easy, and a variable speed trigger allows for precision grease application.

Also among the feature set of this model are bright LED lights for working in darker spaces and an anti-debris filter that protects the pump mechanism from dirt and other contaminants. Since this grease gun is a bit on the heavy side, it also features an anti-scuff foot to let you set down and rest the tool on flat surfaces while in use. It’s also easy to load and handle. Overall, the battery-powered motor and long hose make greasing go by much quicker.

We noticed two cons with this machine. One, it’s larger and heavier than competing models, making it a bit of a hassle to work within some applications. Two, it doesn’t come standard with a battery, so it has to be purchased separately unless you already have a 20-volt battery on hand. That can add to the overall price of the machine.

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Tips

  • Be careful when loading grease into a grease pump. You’ll want to prevent introducing contaminants or foreign particles that might damage the machinery.
  • Always check that the dispensing nozzle is clean before using it. To do this, pump a small amount of grease through the nozzle and wipe it off with a clean rag. Now, you’re good to go to lubricate any fittings or other parts without accidentally also adding dirt.
  • Make sure you use the correct grease for each fitting or part. Grease comes in a variety of weights and formulations, making it important that you pick the right one for the job.
  • Before introducing new grease to a fitting, make sure you clean off the fitting itself to remove some of the built-up grime. This will help the part work more smoothly.
  • If your grease gun is pressurized, make sure to store it unpressurized when not in use, preferably in a horizontal position to prevent oil leaking out of the grease.

FAQs

Q: Which type of grease gun is best for automotive use?

A: That depends on what type of vehicle you have, how often you want (or need) to use the grease gun, and where you want to deposit the grease to. In most cases, a pneumatic or hand lever grease gun is a good fit if you only occasionally need one. For frequent operation, we’d recommend a battery-powered one, just to make things easier on you.

Q: How much pressure do grease guns put out?

A: This varies by model. In general, they put out anywhere between 0 and 15,000 PSI. Keep in mind that most bearing seals can’t handle more than 500 PSI, so anything in excess of that is wasted power in most cases.

Q: How do you properly store a grease gun?

A: Cartridge tubes should always be stored upright to avoid bleed and separation. If you’ve already loaded a cartridge into a grease gun and want to store it as is, depressurize the gun, wipe it clean to remove contaminants and store it in a horizontal position.

Q: How much grease is dispensed with one pump?

A: The output of a grease gun varies by model, typically between 0.8 and 3 grams per stroke. Some grease guns can be calibrated to adjust the amount of grease dispensed, which is important for proper lubrication.

Final Thoughts

Our top pick is the Lincoln 1162 Air Operated Grease Gun. It’s made from high-quality materials and features an efficient grease delivery system.

If you’re looking for something a little cheaper, check out the Lumax LX-1152 Heavy Duty Pistol Grease Gun. As a hand lever grease gun, it’s easy to operate and delivers high-pressure.

What do you think of our picks? Do you have a favorite grease gun of your own? Let us know your thoughts in the comments down below!

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Honda City BS6 Petrol Launched In India, Prices Start At &#8377 9.91 Lakh

Honda has launched the new BS6 compliant version of the City petrol has been launched in India at ₹ 9.91 lakh (ex-showroom, Delhi) for the base V MT variant going all the way up to ₹ 14.31 lakh for the top end ZX AT variant. The Japanese carmaker has converted only the petrol engine (both manual and automatic) to BS6 at the moment and has said that the BS6 compliant diesel engine will be introduced subsequently.

The company has also introduced the Digipad 2.0 infotainment system that supports Apple CarPlay and Android Auto in the V, VX and ZX variants of the City. Other features that the system offers are a satellite linked turn-by-turn navigation, live traffic support through USB and Wi-Fi receiver, voice command, messages, bluetooth handsfree telephony and audio and wireless infrared remote. Commenting on the launch Rajesh Goel, Sr. Vice President & Director, Marketing and Sales, Honda Cars India Ltd, said, “Honda is committed to bring its latest and advanced environment friendly technologies to the Indian market in line with the policy framework of Government of India. The launch of BS-6 Honda City will be followed by sequential introduction of BS-6 versions of other models in our line-up.” He further added, “The new Digipad 2.0 in the Honda City will provide enhanced features, along with greater access and connectivity on the go to our customers, thereby delivering ease and convenience.”

The car is powered by the same 1.5-litre i-Vtec petrol engine which is now BS6 complaint and is mated to a six-speed manual gearbox as standard while a CVT automatic gearbox is optional. The next-generation Honda City that was recently unveiled in Thailand is likely to use the same powetrian coupled with the iMMD hybrid technology. The company has also been selling the CR-V and Civic with the BS6 compliant petrol engine and will be converting its entire model line-up into BS6 ahead of the deadline.

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McLaren's head of aerodynamics leaves team

McLaren look set for more personnel changes in the winter following the departure of their head of aerodynamics, Guillaume Cattelani, according to Motorsport.com.

Team principal Andreas Seidl and technical director James Key have been at the heart of a major restructuring process at the Woking team as they continue to work towards restoring the glory days.

And now McLaren are on the hunt for another new face to head up their aerodynamic department with Cattelani now placed on gardening leave.

Cattelani first joined McLaren from Lotus (now Renault) in 2014 and, prior to that, was aero chief of Peugeot’s Le Mans project from 2006 to 2012 after first starting his career with Lola.

He is now being linked with a move to Haas in 2020 having also worked as a consultant for Dallara in the past, but neither McLaren nor Haas are prepared to comment on the matter.

It is as yet unknown whether McLaren will employ from within the team or look again at securing a name currently working outside of the organisation.

McLaren enjoyed their best season since 2012 following a P4 finish in the Constructors’ Championship this season.

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McLaren set for aero department reshuffle after Cattelani exit

McLaren is set for a reshuffle of its aero department, Motorsport.com has learned, with its head of aerodynamics Guillaume Cattelani having left the team.

The Frenchman, who has been in the role since June 2014, is currently on gardening leave to see out his contract.

Discussions are ongoing about when he will be free to join a rival outfit, with speculation linking him with a move to the Haas team in the early part of next year.

A switch to Haas would see him link up again with the team’s technical partner Dallara, where he worked from 2004 until 2006.

After that spell, Cattelani was at Peugeot Sport where he was head of aerodynamics and then chief designer of its 908 Le Mans car. In 2012, he joined Lotus as its principal aerodynamicist before his move to McLaren.

Following the arrival at McLaren of new team principal Andreas Seidl earlier this year, the team has been restructuring and rebuilding in its bid to move forward.

Cattelani’s departure, by mutual consent, hints at a fresh face arriving at the team to push its aero programme forward – but there has been no confirmation of this.

McLaren declined to elaborate on the news when contacted. A team spokesman said: “We never comment on personnel matters.”

Haas also declined to comment on the speculation linking Cattelani with a move there.

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